US Chamber of Commerce GIPC hails USTR Special 301 Report

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Continued focus on India, China critical to global innovation:GIPC President and CEO David Hirschmann

Hailing the recently released 2015 Special 301 Report of the US Trade Representative, (USTR), the US Chamber of Commerce’s Global Intellectual Property Center (GIPC) President and CEO David Hirschmann made the point that the report’s message was consistent with the findings of GIPC’s International IP Index, as it offered a compelling rationale for countries to adopt much more ambitious IP models to help drive economic growth and job creation.

“It also outlines how the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) offers a unique opportunity for many of the countries included in the report to build a foundation to help pivot these economies from being net-consumers of intellectual property to net-exporters in the knowledge economy.

He also welcomed USTR’s continued attention to persistent IP challenges in India and China, reasoning that with an enhanced commitment to IP, both countries would enjoy earlier access to innovative products from the US, and encourage the creativity of nearly three billion citizens whose innovative potential remains largely untapped.

He went on to list areas identified by both the Special 301 Report and the GIPC Index, including patentability requirements, use of compulsory licensing, forced technology transfer and localisation, and copyright protection, among others, where reforms to strengthen IP would deliver immediate benefits for the US, Indian and Chinese economies.

The US Chamber’s Special 301 Submission to USTR provided an overall assessment of both global systemic IP trends and significant IP issues affecting the following economies: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, European Union, India, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, and Thailand.

The Chamber’s Global Intellectual Property Center is working around the world to champion intellectual property (IP) rights as vital to creating jobs, saving lives, advancing global economic growth, and generating breakthrough solutions to global challenges.

David HirschmannGlobal Intellectual Property Centerintellectual property rightsSpecial 301 ReportUS Chamber of CommerceUS Trade Representative